Sunday, July 10, 2016

Enduring Oak...

While visiting a friend's place, I came across a majestic tree in their yard. I have no knowledge of trees, so I asked them which tree it was. It looked royal. It stood apart with an imperial presence. My friends told me that it was oak tree. And then they asked me to look closer. I didn't comprehend what they were pointing at. So I returned a blank look. Then, the owner clarified. The oak tree was split in the middle but was joining slowly. Due to some disease, the middle of the tree had died. But the stalks and the branches around it had survived and they were progressively encircling the dead midsection. I was amazed at the sight. I said to myself, "Life is choking death here." The phrase stayed with me. It was a classic example of survival of the fittest. And it was in keeping with the symbolism attached to Oak trees. They are epitomes of endurance. They are exemplars of continuity. I came home and wrote these lines:

Reeds encircle tree
True to the spirit of Oak
Choking death with life...


This is the picture of the oak tree in my friend's yard. Look closely at the split in the middle.


I dwelt some more time on these deciduous trees. And I read about the oracle at Dodona. Oak was associated with prophecy in Greek mythology. The oracle at Dodona was consulted by many warriors like Achilles and Odysseus as a guide to their future course of action. Another very interesting thing I found out about oak was that it was ink made from oak gall-nut which was used to write major works in Western history like Magna Carta and Mozart's music. Here are the lines I wrote based on these two discoveries:


Rustling prophecy
Dodonian Oak whispers to
Valiant Heroes

Seekers, Wanderers
Hearken to bronze resonance
Forward Tread in Faith

Lost in history
Bicentennial oak
Survives as Legend

----------


Larvae-laden leaf -
Did a wasp write history?
It's an Oak-bred wor(l)d
------------

Linking it to Day 2 of Write Tribe Festival of Words #5





You might also like

Chalk Art

Dutiful Daughter

21 comments:

  1. Its amazing to see how the oak endures and heals itself.sometimes, nature also teaches us great lessons. Nice poems Sunaina.

    ReplyDelete
  2. New to me ... Nature is a wonderful teacher.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I didn't know these interesting facts about the Oak. And what a beautiful yard your friend has.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow, interesting facts.Thanks for sharing Sunaina.It feels good when you go deep into something. Suzy is right- Beautiful yard.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Epitome of endurance, what a wonderful thought. Enjoyed your lines.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love that idea that life will find a way!

    ReplyDelete
  7. it's amazing how life grows... Nature works in strange ways :) I have never seen this.

    ReplyDelete
  8. That sounds so intriguing..I liked the association with history as it was something new to me. Nature can be so baffling at times.

    ReplyDelete
  9. An oak split in the middle, and the branches heal the tree! I have never seen such a thing till date. Nature truly is wonderful :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. It sounds an allegorical story to me. However, when I went home, last time, I saw a jack fruit tree in my yard with a hole in he place of the trunk at the lower part. My initial reaction was to cut it down. But I waited to give it a chance and it didn't disappoint me. Yes nature is indeed wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. agree to @Prasannakumary Raghavan. very symbolical post and the nature always amazes us every day.

      Delete
  11. This is simply amazing! Never heard about this! Very interesting knowledge on the oak you have shared. Best of all your verses....they flow so beautifully! So much depth!

    ReplyDelete
  12. for me it is kind of rebirth the tree had..

    ReplyDelete
  13. Wow! what a story and thank you for sharing. Never knew about this. Lovely verses.

    ReplyDelete
  14. omg that oak tree is so dramatic. nice post
    Regards
    Tina

    ReplyDelete
  15. Wow! That's an interesting and insightful post. Was not aware of this unique endurance aspect of the mighty oaks!

    ReplyDelete
  16. such a wonderful post! both interesting and beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  17. We have a Norway Oak in our front yard where I live in upstate New York. It isn't split like that but the upper part looks a lot like yours does. We thought it was rotting and would have to be torn down but good news - a tree service says some judicious pruning will do the trick. Happy for your tree, too. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  18. Majestic words to describe a majestic tree.

    ReplyDelete